Infographic: The 10 Most Impressive Civil Engineering Projects of All Time – Visual Capitalist

Ranked: America’s Best States to Do Business In
Visualizing Major Layoffs At U.S. Corporations
3 Reasons for the Fertilizer and Food Shortage
Countries with the Highest Default Risk in 2022
The $100 Trillion Global Economy in One Chart
Visualized: The State of Central Bank Digital Currencies
The Evolution of Media: Visualizing a Data-Driven Future
33 Problems With Media in One Chart
The Top Downloaded Apps in 2022
Synthetic Biology: The $3.6 Trillion Science Changing Life as We Know It
Visualized: The State of Central Bank Digital Currencies
Mapped: The Salary You Need to Buy a Home in 50 U.S. Cities
Countries with the Highest Default Risk in 2022
What Does It Take To Be Wealthy in America?
Household Income Distribution in the U.S. Visualized as 100 Homes
Visualizing the Relationship Between Cancer and Lifespan
Explainer: What to Know About Monkeypox
Visualizing How COVID-19 Antiviral Pills and Vaccines Work at the Cellular Level
Mapped: The Most Common Illicit Drugs in the World
Visualizing The Most Widespread Blood Types in Every Country
Visualizing 10 Years of Global EV Sales by Country
Which Countries Produce the Most Natural Gas?
Visualizing the World’s Largest Oil Producers
A Lifetime’s Consumption of Fossil Fuels, Visualized
Visualized: Battery Vs. Hydrogen Fuel Cell
Ranked: The 20 Countries With the Fastest Declining Populations
Iconic Infographic Map Compares the World’s Mountains and Rivers
Mapped: A Decade of Population Growth and Decline in U.S. Counties
Mapped: The State of Global Democracy in 2022
Mapped: Solar and Wind Power by Country
Mapped: The 10 Largest Gold Mines in the World, by Production
The 50 Minerals Critical to U.S. Security
Visualizing China’s Dominance in Clean Energy Metals
The Periodic Table of Commodity Returns (2012-2021)
Visualizing the Abundance of Elements in the Earth’s Crust
All the Contents of the Universe, in One Graphic
Explained: The Relationship Between Climate Change and Wildfires
Visualizing 10 Years of Global EV Sales by Country
Timeline: The Domestication of Animals
5 Things to Know About Europe’s Scorching Heatwave
Published
on
By
The 10 Most Impressive Civil Engineering Projects of All Time
With every day that passes, thousands of new civil engineering projects are completed around the globe. They might be as simple as building the foundation for a house or as complex as designing a suspension bridge that spans an entire river.
Once in a while, however, a very special type of civil engineering marvel gets finished that is earmarked to forever exist in a league of its own.
Today’s infographic comes to us from Norwich University, and it counts down the 10 most impressive civil engineering projects ever completed by humanity.
These unique and extremely bold endeavors tend to exceed all normal standards of size, complexity, and manpower required. They transcend time and bestow wonder upon new generations, showing that incredible feats are possible with the right team, ideas, and expertise at hand.
Some of these projects were also included on the 1994 list of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World, put together by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
Meanwhile, the Great Pyramid is the only entry from the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World list.
Here are the projects, going from #10 all the way to #1:
10. Qingdao Haiwan Bridge
This 26.4 mile (42.5 km) bridge was completed in 2011 in China, using 450,000 tons of steel and 3 million cubic yards of concrete.
9. Burj Khalifa
The world’s tallest skyscraper is one of many fascinating projects in Dubai. It reaches 2,717 ft (828 m) in height, almost a full 1,000 ft higher than One World Trade Center in New York.
8. English Channel Tunnel
This 31 mile (50 km) long tunnel is also up to 250 ft (76 m) deep, connecting England and France.
7. Golden Gate Bridge
This historic wonder connects San Francisco to the rest of the bay, and needed an incredible 600,000 rivets in its construction.
6. Hoover Dam
This dam formed the largest man-made lake in the Western Hemisphere, and it generates 4 billion kWh of energy per year.
5. Panama Canal
This 47 mile (77 km) long man-made canal was designed to connect the Atlantic and Pacific oceans to provide trade ships with passage between North and South America. It needed more than 60 million pounds of dynamite to dig.
4. Brooklyn Bridge
The first suspension bridge to use steel in its cables was also the longest in the world at the time of its construction.
3. Aqueduct of Segovia
This amazing aqueduct in Spain was made without the use of mortar, and is so well-preserved that it is still in use today.
2. Great Wall of China
What many people do not know about this enormous 5,500 mile (8,850 km) long wall is that the mortar connecting stones was made from rice flour.
1. Great Pyramid of Giza
This incredible creation is made of 2.3 million stone blocks, which required the constant labor of 30,000 people to build. It was the tallest man-made structure for more than 3,800 years.
The list represents the ranking as done by Norwich University’s civil engineering department, and surely there are other incredible feats that are missed by this ranking. Those would include projects like the Three Gorges Dam in China, the CN Tower, and many other worthy accomplishments.
A Timeline of Media-Inflamed Fears (2000-2017)
Beautiful Maps of the World’s Watersheds
Mapped: The Fastest (and Slowest) Internet Speeds in the World
Such Great Heights: Where Are the World’s Tallest Buildings?
Charting the Last 20 Years of Supertall Skyscrapers
A Visual Timeline of the Tallest Historical Structures
Ranked: The Autonomous Vehicle Readiness of 20 Countries
Taking Advantage of the Infrastructure Boom: The Case for Taxable Municipal Bonds
This graphic uses survey data from Travel + Leisure magazine to show the 25 best islands to visit around the world.
Published
on
By
After a pandemic-induced slump, travel is finally started to pick up again in many parts of the world. After years of waiting, where are people itching to go to on their next vacation?
This graphic uses survey data from Travel + Leisure (T+L) magazine to highlight the 25 top-ranked islands to visit around the world.
Before diving in, it’s worth summarizing the methodology and briefly explaining how T+L compiled their findings. Each year, T+L conducts an annual global survey that uncovers the top travel experiences worldwide.
In the survey, readers were asked to rate a range of things, including their favorite islands to visit. Islands were rated based on a few categories, including:
Each category was given a score of excellent, above average, average, below average, or poor. From there, each island’s final tally was calculated, based on the average scores across all categories. Below, we’ll dive into the 2022 rankings based on these scores.
At the top of the list, there’s a good mix of European, Asian, and South Pacific islands. Here’s a look at the top five islands, along with some context that explains why respondents ranked them so highly:
Nestled in the gulf of Naples about an hour away from the mainland, this charming volcanic island takes first place because of its charming villages, pristine beaches, and welcoming locals.
It’s also well-known for its hot springs, which are easily accessible by either taxi or public transport.
Famous for its baby-blue waters, respondents ranked the Maldives as their second-favorite island destination. Located in the Indian Ocean, this collection of islands is well-known for stunning beaches, as well as excellent snorkeling and diving. With a wide range of luxury resorts, the Maldives is also a popular honeymoon destination.
This Indonesia island ranks third on the list because of its picturesque natural beauty, rich culture, and a diverse range of outdoor activities like surfing, diving, and hiking. It’s also well-known for its art, music, and traditional dance performances. As the only predominantly Hindu province in Indonesia, visitors get a chance to learn more about Balinese Hinduism.
Located in the Aegean Sea, Milos is well-loved by visitors because of its tranquil beaches. And while the island is a popular tourist destination, it offers a slightly slower pace that its neighbors Santorini or Mykonos.
This remote group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean ranked fifth on the list because of their rich marine life and friendly locals. Well-known for its excellent diving, it’s been labeled the “soft coral capital of the world.”
Seven of the top 25 island destinations are in Europe, making it first on the list by region. Southeast Asia comes in close second, with six islands in the top 25.
As the data shows, a majority of the islands rank highly because of their beautiful beaches and thriving marine life.
However, there are a couple of outliers on the list. One good example of an outlier is Mackinac Island, which is well-loved for its historical attractions (Mackinac Island is home to a colonial fort built in the 18th century).
One thing is clear from these rankings—whether you’re a diver, a history buff, or a foodie, there are a number of world-class island destinations that offer an experience of a lifetime.
This graphic paints a picture of the world’s population, showing which countries are most likely to welcome the next 1,000 babies.
Published
on
By
View a higher resolution version of this map.
Every four minutes, approximately 1,000 babies are born across the globe. But in which countries are these babies the most statistically likely to come from?
Using data from the CIA World Factbook, this graphic by Pratap Vardhan (Stats of India) paints a picture of the world’s demographics, showing which countries are most likely to welcome the next 1,000 babies based on population and birth rates as of 2022 estimates.
Considering India has a population of nearly 1.4 billion, it’s fairly unsurprising that it ranks first on the list. Of every 1,000 babies born, the South Asian country accounts for roughly 172 of them.
It’s worth noting that, while India ranks number one on the list, the country’s birth rate (which is its total number of births in a year per 1,000 individuals) is actually slightly below the global average, at 16.8 compared to 17.7 respectively.
China, which comes second on the list, is similar to India, with a high population but relatively low birth rate as well. On the other hand, Nigeria, which ranks third on the list, has a birth rate that’s nearly double the global average, at 34.2.
Why is Nigeria’s birth rate so high?
There are various intermingling factors at play, but one key reason is the fact that Nigeria’s economy still is developing, and ranks 131st globally in terms of GDP per capita. Further, access to education for women is still not as widespread as it could be, and research shows that this is strongly correlated with higher birth rates.
While there are hundreds of thousands of babies born around the world each day, it’s worth mentioning that the world’s overall population growth rate has actually been declining since the 1960s.
This is happening for a number of reasons, including:
By 2100, global population growth is expected to drop to 0.1%, which means we’ll essentially reach net-zero population growth.
This would increase our global median age even further, which poses a number of economic risks if countries don’t properly prepare for this demographic shift.
Visualizing Which Countries Drink the Most Beer
Mapped: The Salary You Need to Buy a Home in 50 U.S. Cities
Which Countries Produce the Most Natural Gas?
Ranked: Top 10 Countries by Military Spending
Brand Loyalty is Declining for Most Luxury Automakers
Ranked: The Most and Least Livable Cities in 2022
Sharpen Your Thinking with These 10 Powerful Cognitive Razors
Visualized: The Value of U.S. Imports of Goods by State
Copyright © 2022 Visual Capitalist

source

Leave a Comment