Can You Answer These Product Manager Interview Questions? – blog.powertofly.com

If you’re interviewing for Product Manager roles, you should be ready to answer some product-management-specific interview questions in addition to the more generic ones we’ve all come to know and love.
These more specific questions will give you an opportunity to highlight your experience with user testing, data-driven decision making, and stakeholder management, as well as any other skills that allow you to excel as a product manager.
To help you prepare, we asked Product Managers at 9 of our partner companies to share their must-ask product manager interview questions, and what they look for in candidates’ answers. Here are their responses:

Table of Contents

1) How would you describe a healthy relationship between a PM, an engineer, and a designer?

Respect is the primary ingredient that lays the foundation for a healthy PM/Engineer/Designer relationship. Each role brings a unique perspective and set of skills, so respect and trust in one another creates a constructive tension that builds better products. – Irena Lam, Product Manager at Karat

Apply to Be a Product Manager at Karat

2) Tell me about a time when you had to educate yourself on a new type of user/customer. What did you learn and how did you learn it?

I’m looking for thoughtfulness, strategy, and rigor in the answer. I want to see that understanding users was valued and that the candidate took complete ownership of that challenge. And, that they are willing to walk through walls to understand those customers’ goals and needs. A red flag answer would be something like: “We have user personas so I just used those” or “We have a research department and they talk to the users.” – Jeffrey Domke, Head of Growth at Blockstack

Apply to Be a Product Manager at Blockstack

3) What motivates you for work day to day? What motivates you when you think about the next 5 to 10 years?

This is an open-ended question that can provide many insights into a candidate. Do they have something driving them? Are they ambitious? Are they pragmatic? Are they thoughtful? How do they think about balancing the near vs. long term? Is their motivation in line with our motivation as a company? Do they structure their answer well? This isn’t the type of question you can study to answer well (like how many golf balls can you fit in a 747?).

I look for:

  • Genuine answers
  • Structured, non-rambling answers
  • Examples of how their past experience influences them today
  • Ambition balanced with pragmatism
  • A sense of purpose
  • A lifelong learner mentality
  • A sense of ownership
  • Alignment with the role

Hannah Curtis, Senior Product Manager at Chainalysis

Apply to be a Product Manager at Chainalysis

4) Walk me through a complicated new feature or product that they’ve recently worked on, taking me through the process from initial idea through launch.

The answer to this question can go in all sorts of interesting directions but I look for a number of different things in the candidate’s response. First, can the candidate explain a complicated subject in a structured way that’s easy to understand. Effective communication is a key skill for a product manager. What part of the process do they focus on – the business objectives, getting feedback from customers, working with engineering, the launch, etc.?

This often reveals not only their experience but which of the many different product management responsibilities they really enjoy doing. Last, I look for how they talk about their role and accomplishments within the context of the team. Did they have unique contributions but also give credit to their teammates. – Andrea Beckman, Director, Product Management at Relativity

Apply to Be a Product Manager at Relativity

5) What are two to three pain points of traditional linear TV?

We like to give candidates a new problem space and ask them to identify problems and build solutions.

We look for candidates to set a framework that helps them structure their thinking and response. A good candidate should explain how they would research and understand the problem. The candidate should should identify clear objectives and the main stakeholders. Finally, the candidate should speak to how they would balance tradeoffs and prioritize. – Joshua Lee, CTO and Head of Product at EDO

Apply to be a Product Manager at EDO

6) Tell me about a specific time you were working with a colleague or customer and they weren’t communicating the reasoning behind their request, just the end feature. What tactics did you employ to dig deeper to uncover the real meaning of their request? What was the eventual outcome?

This is an important question because being problem-focused (vs. solution-focused) is really really important for a Product Manager. I also like the phrasing of this question because it allows people to highlight transferrable skills: this is an experience a lot of people can have, and how they respond to it can say a lot about how they think through problems.

What we look for in an answer: We like to see that candidates are communicating with the requestor to dig into the root of the challenge and how they came to make the request. It’s also great to hear that candidates are actively collaborating to come to a compromise or solution rather than rejecting a challenging original request as-is. A good answer might sound like:

“I sat down with them and talked through what the challenge was they were facing and why they wanted that specific request. We went through it and it turned out that what they really wanted wasn’t X, but to help them do Y. They didn’t think Z was possible so they asked for X because they figured we would say yes to that. After talking through it through, we settled on how something we were already working on could address this same need.”

Alex Powell, Director of Product Management at Greenhouse

Apply to Be a Product Manager at Greenhouse

7) Tell me about a time that you had to make a trade off or prioritization decisions. How did you decide on your course of action? Who was the most negatively impacted by your decision? What might have happened if you did the next thing on the list instead?

This question helps me understand how they make prioritization decisions which is one of the most important aspects of PM, but also the empathy they have for who and what those decisions impact. The last part digs into how well they understood the problem they were solving. Generally if they can’t talk about the next option, it wasn’t that hard of a prioritization decision. – Sergi Isasi, Product Manager at Cloudflare

Apply to Be a Product Manager at Cloudflare

8) Tell me about a hobby of yours. Give me a product idea that would fit in that area and explain how it could disrupt or assist the current products in the landscape.

I like this question because it helps me learn a lot about the person as well as how they think. One of the most important things I look for is a person’s ability to empathize with their user. If the candidate can truly put themselves in the shoes of the person they are serving, and prioritize those needs, I’m pretty impressed.

Also, I always pay attention to how the candidate speaks about other people in general—whether stakeholders or teammates. This helps me assess leadership skills. Oftentimes, candidates can focus so much on the abstract problem (competition, design, etc), that they forget to factor in the most challenging part—getting the rest of the team bought in. – Fontaine Foxworth, Product Manager at Google

Apply to Be a Product Manager at Google

9) Imagine I’m calling an engineer who you worked closely with at your last job. What three words or phrases would they use to describe what you’re like as a product manager?

The redirection to asking colleagues makes them think more objectively about their strengths/weaknesses.The candidate almost always provides 3 positive qualities, or strengths, such as “curious” or “dedicated to understanding customer needs.”

I will then ask them to dive deeper into one of the 3 answers they’ve provided, usually focusing on the most vague response. Such as, “tell me a way in which you demonstrated dedication to understanding customer needs.”

Then I say to them, “Let’s pretend I’m calling that same colleague above. What is one area they’d say you could be better at or need improvement on.” I then ask them to explain that one a bit more with a real example.

This series of questions provides me with a more complete and more objective picture of their strengths and weaknesses. – Maya Voskoboynikov, Director of Product Management, Software at PAX Labs

Apply to Be a Product Manager at PAX Labs

10) Explain a time that you met opposition in your approach or prioritization to a project. How did you navigate through it?

Here I’m looking for a couple things. 1) what tools/approaches do you leverage to help make your argument and 2) how do you handle confrontation.

Do you use data to drive alignment with stakeholders or are you a storyteller who is a customer centric decision maker? Do you adapt your argument based on the stakeholder you’re engaging with, knowing what will help lead them to align with your prioritization? This is one of the most common challenges a product manager faces and each situation may be different, but I’m confident you have faced some version of this and can speak to it from your own experience.

Have a story that didn’t turn out so hot in the end? Great! Use it. Tell us what didn’t go well about it and what you’d change if you could go back! Being vulnerable and sharing examples of failures you’ve learned from is almost a sure fire way to get a hiring manager bought in on you. It tells us that you’re mature, self-reflective and can take constructive feedback well. All key characteristics we look for in product leaders.

The gem in this question is really how you approach confrontation. As product leaders, we are constantly challenged by engineers, stakeholders and other product managers, as such, we have to be comfortable dealing with confrontation.Crucial Conversations is my secret weapon and I highly encourage every single person to read it multiple times in their lives. I usually have a copy on my desk as a constant reminder. The ability to be comfortable navigating through an uncomfortable discussion not only builds relationships, helps to resolve issues quickly and promotes self-esteem and confidence, but it is a great reflection of one’s maturity. When an applicant can tackle a difficult conversation with differing opinions successfully, it instills confidence that they can self manage. – Amory Borromeo, Senior Technical Product Manager at Carvana

Apply to be a Product Manager at Carvana

11) How do you empathize with your stakeholders?

In addition to being incessantly curious and comfortable dealing with uncomfortable situations, I want to make sure that my product leaders know how to empathize. Can you get to the root of a problem and really help craft a solution that will delight the end user? A favorite quote of mine is Henry Ford’s, “If I asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” Product managers are often presented with solutions and we have to take the time to peel back the onion layers to truly understand the issue. I’ll almost always ask this question in an interview, although I’ll often word it differently with the hope of getting a story or two out of it:

This is a great opportunity to pull in some experience examples, where you were able to really understand the need your end user or stakeholder was asking for and craft a thoughtful solution that met their needs more than their ask for faster horses. A great product manager will be able to speak for the stakeholder and/or end users when working with their engineering teams because they are so fully aware of the issue, workflows, process, product, etc.

Take the time to shadow the end user, sit with the stakeholder and ask deeper investigating questions until you are so fully entrenched in the ask, that you could answer questions the same way a stakeholder would. You’ll be surprised how often you find that the users have come up with workarounds or have completely overlooked alternative solutions because of their own biases based on their day to day interactions. This amount of empathy can also directly impact your ability to align with stakeholders because it builds a stronger relationship and proves your genuine interest in creating a better world for your end users. – Amory Borromeo, Senior Technical Product Manager at Carvana

12) Which two adjectives would you use to best describe your ideal work environment?

How you answer will help us understand what your values are. What matters most to you and what drives you? Do you need a collaborative environment? Do you like the autonomy to figure things out on your own? Does being surrounded by curious or ambitious people help push you to be a better version of yourself? So much can be pulled from these two simple words, but there is also something to be said about how you answer.

Do you simply say the two words and leave it at that, or do you elaborate to explain? Do you ask if we’d like you to explain your reasoning and create an opportunity to have further discussion? One of my favorite responses was when someone said the two words. Paused to say she could explain more if I’d like, but would be curious what my answers would be. This indicated that she could follow direction, was comfortable with a bit of ambiguity, knew how to navigate through the awkwardness I had laid out for her and cared about connecting and building relationships! – Amory Borromeo, Senior Technical Product Manager at Carvana

Respect is the primary ingredient that lays the foundation for a healthy PM/Engineer/Designer relationship. Each role brings a unique perspective and set of skills, so respect and trust in one another creates a constructive tension that builds better products. – Irena Lam, Product Manager at Karat
Apply to Be a Product Manager at Karat
I’m looking for thoughtfulness, strategy, and rigor in the answer. I want to see that understanding users was valued and that the candidate took complete ownership of that challenge. And, that they are willing to walk through walls to understand those customers’ goals and needs. A red flag answer would be something like: “We have user personas so I just used those” or “We have a research department and they talk to the users.” – Jeffrey Domke, Head of Growth at Blockstack
Apply to Be a Product Manager at Blockstack
This is an open-ended question that can provide many insights into a candidate. Do they have something driving them? Are they ambitious? Are they pragmatic? Are they thoughtful? How do they think about balancing the near vs. long term? Is their motivation in line with our motivation as a company? Do they structure their answer well? This isn’t the type of question you can study to answer well (like how many golf balls can you fit in a 747?).
Hannah Curtis, Senior Product Manager at Chainalysis
Apply to be a Product Manager at Chainalysis
The answer to this question can go in all sorts of interesting directions but I look for a number of different things in the candidate’s response. First, can the candidate explain a complicated subject in a structured way that’s easy to understand. Effective communication is a key skill for a product manager. What part of the process do they focus on – the business objectives, getting feedback from customers, working with engineering, the launch, etc.?
This often reveals not only their experience but which of the many different product management responsibilities they really enjoy doing. Last, I look for how they talk about their role and accomplishments within the context of the team. Did they have unique contributions but also give credit to their teammates. – Andrea Beckman, Director, Product Management at Relativity
Apply to Be a Product Manager at Relativity
We like to give candidates a new problem space and ask them to identify problems and build solutions.

We look for candidates to set a framework that helps them structure their thinking and response. A good candidate should explain how they would research and understand the problem. The candidate should should identify clear objectives and the main stakeholders. Finally, the candidate should speak to how they would balance tradeoffs and prioritize. – Joshua Lee, CTO and Head of Product at EDO
Apply to be a Product Manager at EDO
This is an important question because being problem-focused (vs. solution-focused) is really really important for a Product Manager. I also like the phrasing of this question because it allows people to highlight transferrable skills: this is an experience a lot of people can have, and how they respond to it can say a lot about how they think through problems.

What we look for in an answer: We like to see that candidates are communicating with the requestor to dig into the root of the challenge and how they came to make the request. It’s also great to hear that candidates are actively collaborating to come to a compromise or solution rather than rejecting a challenging original request as-is. A good answer might sound like:

“I sat down with them and talked through what the challenge was they were facing and why they wanted that specific request. We went through it and it turned out that what they really wanted wasn’t X, but to help them do Y. They didn’t think Z was possible so they asked for X because they figured we would say yes to that. After talking through it through, we settled on how something we were already working on could address this same need.”
Alex Powell, Director of Product Management at Greenhouse
Apply to Be a Product Manager at Greenhouse
This question helps me understand how they make prioritization decisions which is one of the most important aspects of PM, but also the empathy they have for who and what those decisions impact. The last part digs into how well they understood the problem they were solving. Generally if they can’t talk about the next option, it wasn’t that hard of a prioritization decision. – Sergi Isasi, Product Manager at Cloudflare
Apply to Be a Product Manager at Cloudflare
I like this question because it helps me learn a lot about the person as well as how they think. One of the most important things I look for is a person’s ability to empathize with their user. If the candidate can truly put themselves in the shoes of the person they are serving, and prioritize those needs, I’m pretty impressed.
Also, I always pay attention to how the candidate speaks about other people in general—whether stakeholders or teammates. This helps me assess leadership skills. Oftentimes, candidates can focus so much on the abstract problem (competition, design, etc), that they forget to factor in the most challenging part—getting the rest of the team bought in. – Fontaine Foxworth, Product Manager at Google
Apply to Be a Product Manager at Google

The redirection to asking colleagues makes them think more objectively about their strengths/weaknesses.The candidate almost always provides 3 positive qualities, or strengths, such as “curious” or “dedicated to understanding customer needs.”
I will then ask them to dive deeper into one of the 3 answers they’ve provided, usually focusing on the most vague response. Such as, “tell me a way in which you demonstrated dedication to understanding customer needs.”
Then I say to them, “Let’s pretend I’m calling that same colleague above. What is one area they’d say you could be better at or need improvement on.” I then ask them to explain that one a bit more with a real example.
This series of questions provides me with a more complete and more objective picture of their strengths and weaknesses. – Maya Voskoboynikov, Director of Product Management, Software at PAX Labs
Apply to Be a Product Manager at PAX Labs
Here I’m looking for a couple things. 1) what tools/approaches do you leverage to help make your argument and 2) how do you handle confrontation.
Do you use data to drive alignment with stakeholders or are you a storyteller who is a customer centric decision maker? Do you adapt your argument based on the stakeholder you’re engaging with, knowing what will help lead them to align with your prioritization? This is one of the most common challenges a product manager faces and each situation may be different, but I’m confident you have faced some version of this and can speak to it from your own experience.
Have a story that didn’t turn out so hot in the end? Great! Use it. Tell us what didn’t go well about it and what you’d change if you could go back! Being vulnerable and sharing examples of failures you’ve learned from is almost a sure fire way to get a hiring manager bought in on you. It tells us that you’re mature, self-reflective and can take constructive feedback well. All key characteristics we look for in product leaders.
Apply to be a Product Manager at Carvana
In addition to being incessantly curious and comfortable dealing with uncomfortable situations, I want to make sure that my product leaders know how to empathize. Can you get to the root of a problem and really help craft a solution that will delight the end user? A favorite quote of mine is Henry Ford’s, “If I asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” Product managers are often presented with solutions and we have to take the time to peel back the onion layers to truly understand the issue. I’ll almost always ask this question in an interview, although I’ll often word it differently with the hope of getting a story or two out of it:
This is a great opportunity to pull in some experience examples, where you were able to really understand the need your end user or stakeholder was asking for and craft a thoughtful solution that met their needs more than their ask for faster horses. A great product manager will be able to speak for the stakeholder and/or end users when working with their engineering teams because they are so fully aware of the issue, workflows, process, product, etc.
Take the time to shadow the end user, sit with the stakeholder and ask deeper investigating questions until you are so fully entrenched in the ask, that you could answer questions the same way a stakeholder would. You’ll be surprised how often you find that the users have come up with workarounds or have completely overlooked alternative solutions because of their own biases based on their day to day interactions. This amount of empathy can also directly impact your ability to align with stakeholders because it builds a stronger relationship and proves your genuine interest in creating a better world for your end users. – Amory Borromeo, Senior Technical Product Manager at Carvana

How you answer will help us understand what your values are. What matters most to you and what drives you? Do you need a collaborative environment? Do you like the autonomy to figure things out on your own? Does being surrounded by curious or ambitious people help push you to be a better version of yourself? So much can be pulled from these two simple words, but there is also something to be said about how you answer.
Do you simply say the two words and leave it at that, or do you elaborate to explain? Do you ask if we’d like you to explain your reasoning and create an opportunity to have further discussion? One of my favorite responses was when someone said the two words. Paused to say she could explain more if I’d like, but would be curious what my answers would be. This indicated that she could follow direction, was comfortable with a bit of ambiguity, knew how to navigate through the awkwardness I had laid out for her and cared about connecting and building relationships! – Amory Borromeo, Senior Technical Product Manager at Carvana

Now get practicing and get ready to nail your next interview!
From October 18-20, 2022, PowerToFly hosted a three day event featuring speakers and sponsors who shared their learnings and expertise, followed by a virtual hiring event where attendees were able to hear from companies and meet with them directly in breakout rooms to network and learn more about the opportunities they have to offer. In case you missed it, you can relive the entire event here.
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Companies Hiring That We Featured At The Job Fair:
💎Want to join the sports industry? Watch the video to the end to learn what it takes to do it.
📼Break into the sports industry and develop your professional career in the field! Play this video to get three top tips on how to achieve your goals successfully. You’ll hear from Nicole Britenriker, former Senior Team Talent Advisor at the NBA, who will share her advice for those willing to join the sports field.
📼Know the sports industry and find your way. Tip #1: Know what you want to do. You should be able to communicate your interests and goals in an informed way. If you are unsure about what areas of the business you’d like to pursue your career in, it’s okay, ask the experts! Be transparent and ask for help to understand what opportunities you have. The way to determine your desired position is by looking at various job descriptions and organizational titles to find out the possibilities you have. Do your research!
📼The sports industry requires you to reach out. Tip #2: Network with authentic relationships Seek out exploratory and informational interviews. Find mutual ground. Find a mutual friend or contact who can help open the door for you. And when you are making these introductions and connections with people who you are hoping to meet for the first time, bring something beneficial to the table. Be persistent. If somebody doesn’t connect, respond or answer the first time, don’t give up. Individuals are very busy. Always ask someone that you meet who you should talk to and meet next. Networking is the key to success!
No matter where you’re at in your career as you look to advance or get in the door. Upskilling is always a tool that you should utilize in the space that you’re already focused on and even broadening your background to be able to say that you have skills that can translate to other areas. Show what are you bringing to the table and what skills you have that might add to the organization in the team where they have a gap that other people might not already represent. Refining your skills is always something you should be doing in parallel to active job seeking.
📨 Are you interested in joining the NBA? They have open positions! To learn more, click here.
You can connect with Nicole on LinkedIn. Don’t forget to mention this video!
The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a global sports and media organization with the mission to inspire and connect people everywhere through the power of basketball. Built around five professional sports leagues: the NBA, WNBA, NBA G League, NBA 2K League, and Basketball Africa League, the NBA has established a major international presence with games and programming available in 215 countries and territories in more than 50 languages, and merchandise for sale in more than 200 countries and territories on all seven continents. At the start of the 2021-22 season, the NBA rosters featured a record 121 international players from 40 countries. NBA Digital’s assets include NBA TV, NBA.com, the NBA App, and NBA League Pass.
What do civil engineering, architecture, and tech all have in common?
For starters, Joyce Delatorre.
Born and raised in São Paulo, Brazil, Joyce double majored in architecture and civil engineering, worked for over a decade in construction, and is currently navigating the tech world as a bilingual Senior Technical Sales Specialist at Autodesk, a tech company dedicated to helping customers solve problems through designing a better world.
Joyce points out that these three sectors have something else in common: they’re typically male-dominated fields where women may have to fight for their place.
We sat down with Joyce as she lifts the veil on what it’s like being a Latina woman in tech and her advice for other Latina women on establishing a career in such male-dominated spaces.
In Brazil, as Joyce explains, it’s uncommon to see women in high-level management or executive roles. When she started working for a construction company fresh out of college, she struggled with gender expectations and roles that catered to men.
“I’ve noticed that during meetings or on different occasions women often have to prove themselves,” she explains. “When women speak they are often questioned or doubted. In addition, they have to actively insert themselves in certain spaces to be heard. Men on the other hand are taken more seriously and are invited to the conversation more often.”
Joyce points out how women have to fight for their space in male-dominated fields. Fortunately for her, what made this fight a little easier was the encouragement of informal mentors and positive managers.
“I had leaders that helped me gain the confidence to express and execute my ideas,” she shares.
Although she admits that not every leader she’s worked with has been encouraging, the ones that were made all the difference. And this positive support continued when she started working full-time at Autodesk.
Joyce first came to Autodesk through a college internship. “In the beginning, everyone questioned why I was interning at a technology company while studying architecture and engineering,” she shares.
But this questioning didn’t stop Joyce from learning information that she knew would be useful for her in the future.
“For me, it was a good internship because I gained a lot of experience with technology, and innovation,” she shares. “When I started working in construction, I was the person in the company that could use technology to implement new ideas. I was able to introduce new technology into the companies I was working with.”
After college, Joyce started working in construction and spent 12 years in the industry building her career. Perhaps it was fate when three years ago, Autodesk invited her back to take on a full-time position.
In her current role, she is supporting companies across the globe.
“Nowadays, I work in different sectors, not only in construction but also in sanitation, energy, infrastructure, and more,” she explains. “Within these sectors, I’m trying to understand the challenges they encounter and I use technology to help these companies meet their goals.”
Joyce enjoys the breadth of her work and the supportive environment that Autodesk cultivates.
“I enjoy working here because it’s a company that pays attention to all the important details,” she explains. “They care about well-being, work-life balance, diversity, and including more women. They provide us with many opportunities.”
For Joyce, there is a sense of relief being able to work in an environment that is supportive of women’s visibility and contributions. A perspective that is not yet accepted in every part of the tech industry.
Although Joyce has made advancements in her career, there are still many challenges that come with working for an international company.
Since her native language, Portuguese, is the official language of only around 7 countries, Joyce often finds herself navigating her professional interactions by being hyper-aware of language and cultural differences.
“Everything is more challenging for non-native English speakers because not everything is available in our language,” she shares. “We have to prepare and develop everything in advance because oftentimes the information needs to be translated.”

One of the biggest challenges Joyce mentions was when it comes to speaking up in multi-national meetings.
“Every country has its own set of rules and customs,” she points out. “Something that can appear rude for one country is not for the other. So we always have to adapt in order to understand the other cultures especially when it comes to speaking up and communicating in a way that everyone can understand.”
Having this empathy and patience has helped Joyce step into spaces that lacked Latinx representation.
On the other hand, Joyce also highlights the rewards of working in this field. She explains, “You are often connecting with so many people in so many cultures. It’s not an easy field but I think the benefits and the relationships you can create while working in tech will benefit you throughout your career.”
Being a Latina woman in tech comes with both challenges and rewards. Thanks to Joyce’s over fifteen years of experience working in typically male-dominated sectors, we can draw from her history some important lessons. She offers this advice:
Below is an article originally published on Arch’s blog. Visit Arch’s company page on PowerToFly to see their open positions and learn more.
Melike Oz Pasaogullari joined Arch in February 2020, eager to share the knowledge she gained through her experience as an engineer in the insurance industry and make an impact right out of the gate. Within her first year, she was promoted to her current position as Head of Business Process Management for Arch Insurance North America.
Melike’s quick success within the company is largely attributable to her unique skillset and work ethic. She also appreciates Arch’s supportive, open-minded and collaborative culture that has allowed her to thrive and show what she can bring to the table.
Additionally, Melike is a firm believer that embracing diversity allows both individuals and businesses to gain perspective, which can lead to discovering different approaches to problem solving and enabling change. As a leader within the Women and Allies Employee Network, she is excited to empower the next generation of women in insurance.
Arch has multiple offices across the world. Being based in the Hartford, Connecticut, office, I did not expect to be able to connect with my colleagues and build relationships quickly.
I love the culture and having the opportunity to work with people who have different backgrounds and experiences. Everyone is willing to help and share their knowledge, and work together to make things happen. Arch’s culture has enabled me to apply my engineering background and experience in developing operating models, and driving change management to help increase effectiveness and efficiency of Arch Insurance’s end-to-end business processes through innovation, flexibility and integration of technology.
I came to the United States for my graduate degree in industrial engineering and operations research. I did not know a lot about the insurance industry back then, nor thought about a career in insurance until I started looking for a job and thinking about potential roles.
Living in the Hartford, Connecticut, area, the options were mostly centered around insurance. I applied to a business analyst/consultant role as the requirements appeared to align with the skills I had developed through my engineering education. I got the job and have been in the insurance since then.
I learned about Arch through friends and former colleagues who were (and still are) working at Arch. They shared the culture of the company, its successful growth and how much they enjoyed working here, which led me to explore opportunities at Arch.
I think it is the people and culture that make Arch unique. We have a collaborative culture that brings people with diverse views, skillsets and experiences together to effectively deliver value to our customers.
There are many initiatives I have felt passionate about since joining Arch. One of them is the diversity and inclusion efforts and the establishment of the Employee Network groups.
In short, my advice is to keep an open mind, be confident, challenge biases and help drive change! Specifically, I want to highlight the importance of keeping an open mind about a career in insurance and the progress the insurance industry has made in terms of diversity over the years.
Like any other industry, the insurance industry has evolved and will continue to do so, driven by the changes in customer needs and technology. It looked different to me compared to the generation before and it will look much different for the next generations. This is changing the landscape of jobs and skills needed to be successful. Additionally, the insurance industry has an opportunity to attract more women, especially in STEM roles.
As an engineer, insurance was not even on my radar at the beginning of my career search, and now I can recognize so many different career opportunities.

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